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Time to vote out waste at the People’s Design Lab

It's time to vote in the People's Design Lab to eliminate waste.

One of the most challenging waste parts of the zero waste vision is all the waste left after recycling-because it is either too toxic to be recycled safely, or it is made of non-recyclable materials. This is the horrible remnant.

One of the most challenging waste parts of the zero waste vision is all the waste left after recycling-because it is either too toxic to be recycled safely, or it is made of non-recyclable materials. This is the horrible remnant.

This is also the part of waste that proponents of pipeline end technologies such as landfills or incinerators use as a fail-safe excuse to expand the waste, as if the remaining part is inevitable, which is given by nature.

Well, far from it. If you look carefully at the composition of the remaining parts, instead of blindly accepting, then you will be able to evaluate the most suitable solution. At the very least, if something cannot be reused, composted or recycled, it needs to be redesigned appropriately!

A good starting point is to go out for surplus waste. Enter the People’s Design Lab, where you can nominate products that cannot be recycled, reused or repaired; vote for the worst nominated product; and share better ideas. The People's Design Lab was officially launched on April 27 in the gorgeous and inspiring Good Life Center in London, where many zero-waste people nominated the worst and best products first to achieve a zero-waste future.

The four People's Design Lab Award categories are self-explanatory and eye-opening:

– The weakest link award is given to a product that you think can be used for a long time but is broken and cannot be repaired. Perhaps these items cannot be opened or disassembled without causing ultimate damage to the product, or it may be because there are no spare parts. Take an affordable headset as an example. It breaks easily and is difficult (if not impossible) to repair. This is the nomination for the weakest link.

– The trash can once again rewards you for the things you throw away week after week. What do you keep throwing in the trash can? Black food packaging trays, multi-layer envelopes, pump dispensers? The purpose of this disposable award is to highlight and find solutions for products that are designed for limited use. Can't they be made from recycled materials? Are there no alternatives already available or waiting to be developed? The People's Laboratory not only solicits nominations, but also wants to hear your views on the options.

– Prize for unnecessary packaging of Russian dolls. We have all seen these products that need to update their packaging. Maybe they have too many different materials or are made of non-recyclable materials? If you are frustrated with the packaging surrounding the product, or have suggestions for good ideas for alternative packaging, this is the place to share it. Don’t be shy; let’s take a look at pre-peeled repackaged bananas, plastic packaging and cardboard boxes that are only 3/5 full oatmeal packaging, potato chips and biscuit packaging, dead spots in medicine, and other unnecessary waste in our society Absurd example of packaging.

– Reward all other products that need to be redesigned. If your nomination does not fit into any of these categories, please submit it here! For example, small electronic chargers only need to be redesigned. Why must they all be so different? So incompatible? Share your discomfort with People’s Lab and join forces to rethink these products.

Finally, it's time to support zero-waste design. The People's Laboratory also requested nominations for the best zero waste design to celebrate the many breakthrough innovations that have been developed. For example, see the reusable carpet tiles or the ARA chair, which is the first chair to be cradle-to-cradle certified.

participate! There is no time to waste! The People’s Design Lab will be open for nominations and voting before May 27th. Let us all support this creative and interesting strategy to raise awareness of our terrible residual waste part.

Guest post from the world of zero waste

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