Skip to content
EU agrees unprecedented cuts to single-use plastics

The EU agreed to cut the single-use plastic unprecedentedly.

However, activists warned to reduce missing targets and delays in collecting targets

Media Contact:

Roberta Arbinolo, European Zero Waste Communications Officer /Rethink Plastic roberta@zerowasteeurope.eu /+32 2 736 20 91

For immediate release: Brussels, 19/12/2018

After months of intense negotiations, the EU passed a much-anticipated law to reduce EU single-use plastics. According to Rethink Plastic and Break Free From Plastic, the agreed text is an important step forward in tackling plastic pollution, but it does not fully address the urgency of the plastic crisis.

“The EU is the first region to introduce new laws to reduce single-use plastics and reduce plastic pollution in our fields, rivers and oceans, so it is commendable. What is less commendable is that with the support of some governments, plastic lobbying The group can delay and weaken this ambition," said Meadhbh Bolger, who represents Rethink Plastic. "Citizens all over Europe want to see the end of our disposable culture, and politicians have taken the first step. The time is ripe for Europe to transition from single-use plastic to reusable."

The final measures [1] include:

Prohibit the use of a variety of disposable plastic items, including plates, cutlery, and expanded polystyrene food containers and beverage cups. Ensure that manufacturers pay for waste management and cleaning a variety of disposable plastic items, including cigarette butts and fishing gear

However, the agreement failed to adequately address the plastic crisis in key areas, including:

There is no binding EU goal to reduce the consumption of food containers and cups, and EU countries are not obliged to adopt a goal to ensure that 90% of plastic bottles are collected separately for a four-year delay-from 2025 to 2029

"The new law is a major first blow to the plastic pollution monster," said Delphine Lévi Alvarès of Zero Waste Europe, who is responsible for coordinating Europe's "free from plastic" movement. "However, their impact depends on the implementation of our governments. They must immediately adopt ambitious goals to reduce single-use plastics and ensure that producers pay for their pollution. The public call to stop plastic pollution is loud and strong and ignore it. Is unacceptable."

Tomorrow, on December 20, it is expected that the environment ministers of various countries will sign the agreed directives. Member states will have two years to translate it into national law, which should take effect by early 2021 at the latest.

Finish

notes:

[1]

The measures taken include:

What's good:

The EU-wide ban on disposable plastic swabs, straws, plates, tableware, beverage stirrers, balloon sticks, oxidatively degradable plastics, and expanded polystyrene food containers and beverage cups. The expanded producer responsibility program means that manufacturers (including Large tobacco companies and top polluters in the packaging industry such as Coca-Cola, Pepsi and Nestlé) pay for certain single-use plastics (including plastic cigarette filters) for waste management, clean-up and awareness-raising measures-this is the most littering in Europe Articles (most items until January 2023) EU countries are likely to adopt market restrictions on food containers and beverage cups. EU countries are obliged to reduce post-consumer waste of tobacco product filters containing plastic, fishing gear, producer responsibility expansion plans, and members The country requires monitoring the collection rate and setting national collection targets to ensure that all beverage bottles are produced in accordance with the original factory. 30% of the recycled content by 2030. Mark the presence of plastic in the product and the impact of littering on the environment, as well as the appropriateness of the product Waste treatment options

What's not so good:

There is no binding EU goal to reduce the consumption of food containers and cups, and EU countries are not obliged to adopt the goal; instead, countries must "significantly reduce" their consumption, making it vague and open. From 2025 to 2029, achieving 90% of the beverage container collection target is delayed by 4 years, and reaching the intermediate target of 77% by 2025, allowing EU countries to choose to achieve consumption reduction and certain EPR measures through voluntary agreements between industries and authorities Delayed by 3 years to ensure that the lid/lid of the plastic beverage container is connected to the container-from 2021 to 2024

These measures apply to all disposable plastics listed in the annex to the directive, including bio-based plastics and biodegradable plastics.

***

"These new laws are a major blow to plastic pollution monsters. However, their impact depends on the implementation of our governments. The public call to stop plastic pollution is loud and strong, and it is unacceptable to ignore it."

About the latest post

The United Nations decides to control the global dumping of plastic waste-13/05/2019 EU politicians pledge to make Europe zero waste-16/04/2019 Zero waste France starts to rebuild the Ivry-Paris incinerator-11/04/2019

Previous article Reuse the network